Category Archives: Reviews

Book reviews, as well as Reads to Reels

Bonaparte’s Sons

Bonaparte’s Sons © 1998 Richard Howard 400 pages This is the second (of three) posts published during Read of England which have nothing to do with England. I’m trying to get them out of the way before the English stuff … Continue reading

Posted in Reviews | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Drastic Measures

Star Trek Discovery: Drastic Measures © 2018 Dayton Ward 400 pages     The deliberate murder of four thousand people, half the colony’s population, began with an act of mercy.   Refugees were given a new home in the sparsely settled … Continue reading

Posted in Reviews | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Eyeball-eating cats, an OB-GYN’s diary, and plague

Last week I read several titles that  I want to share without necessarily writing full reviews for, since they’re on the shorter side.  They are… This is Going to Hurt: The Secret Diary of a  Junior Doctor, Adam Kay Will … Continue reading

Posted in Reviews | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

The True Soldier

The True Soldier © 2014 Paul Fraser Collard 496 pages Jack Lark hadn’t intended to get involved in a civil war. He’d come to America bearing the letters from a friend who had fallen in combat, a man whose side … Continue reading

Posted in Reviews | Tagged , , | 7 Comments

Are We There Yet?

Are We There Yet? The American Automobile Past, Present, and Driverless ©  2019 Dan Albert 304 pages Are we there yet? I mean, at the end of the book?  Because it’s not fun.  Oh, sure, the author is trying to … Continue reading

Posted in Reviews | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

Tornadoes, the stars, and eternity

I aim to minimize the amount of un-commented-on books in 2020, so here follows some housekeeping! Back in February,  I read Braving the Elements: The Stormy History of American Weather.  It opened with the importance of climate to the various … Continue reading

Posted in Reviews | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

Station Eleven

“I stood looking over my damaged home and tried to forget the sweetness of life on Earth.” In New York City, an acclaimed actor collapses in the middle of his King Lear performance. Hours later, the world as we know … Continue reading

Posted in Reviews | Tagged , | 7 Comments