White Cliffs of ‘Bama

For a while now I’ve wanted to visit the White Cliffs of Epes, Alabama,  which were created around the same time as the far more famous White Cliffs of Dover.   Today was a beautiful autumn day that begged for some kind of adventure, so I sallied forth —  solo, because it was  rather out of the way (near the Mississippi border) and I didn’t know of anyone who would be interested in driving all that way to look at cliffs.

The best approach I could see was to park a ways off, then walk onto the bridge (US-11 passes over the Tombigbee River at this point) and admire them from there. I also saw a way down to the formations themselves, however.   They’re littered with rocks which leave a chalky residue on the hands.

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About smellincoffee

Citizen, librarian, reader with a boundless wonder for the world and a curiosity about all the beings inside it.
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9 Responses to White Cliffs of ‘Bama

  1. Brian Joseph says:

    Wow. This looks like a great place to visit. I am in Alabama on business occasionally and not too far from this location so I may try to visit this place.

  2. Mudpuddle says:

    are they fragile like the ones in England? any fossils?

    • I don’t know if the cliffs themselves are fragile, but the smaller rocks didn’t feel particularly sturdy. I’m not sure if the area has a fossil record. I’ll do some poking!

    • Done some looking:
      http://www.fossilspot.com/STATES/AL.HTM

      All those sites listed as “Eutaw” would be of interest, because Eutaw and Epes are very near each other.

      • Mudpuddle says:

        brachiopods and echinoderms!! yum… not that i’ll ever get there, but it’s good to know some geologist is exploring the area… tx for looking it up!

      • You’re welcome! There’s also a substantial crater over in Wetumpka — north of the capital city Montgomery — which I’ve tried to find a good vantage point of before. It’s heavily forested and on private land, so to date I’ve only been able to wander around aimlessly. Next time I’ll go during a period when the city is active and ask a local!

  3. Marian says:

    That’s lovely…looks like you got there at the right time, too, with that golden light. I had no idea we had white cliffs in the U.S.!

  4. I’ve heard that there are cliffs remniscient of that a landing on the Alabama river, which seems unlikely but I will check it out. There’s also an abandoned church nearby, though it’s on private land. (I have a friend who does land/property surveying, so he often stumbles upon things of interest!)

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