Sunrise to Sunset at the Grand Canyon

I landed in Arizona  late in the afternoon, but as soon as I’d checked into my motel room and purchased a few supplies at the local WalMart, I headed for the Canyon. It didn’t matter to me that it would be getting dark.  In retrospect, I’m entirely glad I went when  I did — not that driving through unknown country in the dark was fun, but my first view of the Grand Canyon was a twilight view. There’s something about the dawn and dusk — their fleetingness — that makes them especially beautiful.

I visited the Canyon three more times that week,  at one time watching the sunrise with a few dozen similarly crazy souls, and have arranged some shots to represent a day spent at the canyon. 

MORNING

Shortly after six a.m, on a cold and windy April morning
On an old mining trail, a young couple stands transfixed by the scenery. 
MID-MORNING
From the observation room of the Desert View Tower, about 26 miles from the visitor’s center
DAY
These and the other “DAY” shots are taken from a helicopter.
Of course I looked down. How could I not?
DUSK

These were taken the same day I arrived in Arizona.
This guy either had nerve or brown underwear, because the wind was blowing at ~30 MPH.
I spent that first evening at the Canyon walking along the rim, soaking in the view and shivering a little in the cold. I hadn’t anticipated the wind, and so left my jacket in my car. The clouds rolling in —  there was rain along the north rim — meant that I couldn’t see the stars come out, so I decided to leave while I had enough light to find my car. 
I hope to visit the Canyon again one day, to hike into the interior and spend a night there — but I’d want to have company! 

About smellincoffee

Citizen, librarian, reader with a boundless wonder for the world and a curiosity about all the beings inside it.
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6 Responses to Sunrise to Sunset at the Grand Canyon

  1. Mudpuddle says:

    wonderful shots… brings back memories in technicolor… you shouldn't go on long walks by yourself and you need plenty of water… i'm sure you know that distances in that country are illusionary: what seems near may be a day's journey away… many tx for sharing…

  2. Stephen says:

    That's one thing I've learned on day hikes — always bring more water than necessary because trails mysteriously become longer than marked!

  3. Marian H says:

    Why can't people stay behind the railings?! Heights are bad enough, I sure don't want to see others capering around on the edge.Anyways… nice job getting the full spectrum of light/shadow/color in these shots. The last one in the “Morning” set is other-worldly. There's something gentle and serene about the morning set, while the evening set feels dramatic, almost a different place.

  4. Elle says:

    OMG!!! These pictures look amazing! I hope to be able to see these canyons for myself one day :)Elle Inked @ Keep on Reading

  5. Stephen says:

    There aren't many railings! There are a few around the main lookout point near the visitor's center, and then around the vehicle pullouts, but otherwise it's up to visitors and their best judgment. Thank you for the comments on the shots. I'm very pleased with a few of them! 🙂

  6. Stephen says:

    I kept saying “one day” and then decided last year just to jump and do it! 🙂

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